2021 St. Louis City Mayoral Election

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St. Louis City’s 2121 Mayoral Election is just around the corner!

On March 2nd four candidates will be on the primary ballot; the two winners will run against each other in the April 6th General Election.
The candidates and their top priorities are listed below. More information can be found on each individual’s website.


Lewis Reed
reedforstlouis.com

  • Reduce crime and gun violence
  • Support workforce development, small businesses, and job growth
  • Protect homeowners at risk of foreclosure
  • Increase government transparency
  • Protect the environment
  • Protect St. Louis’ unique neighborhoods

Tishaura Jonestishaura4mayor.com

  • Committed to equity and inclusion
  • COVID-19 Recovery will be two pronged and focus on the economy and preparedness for future health crisis
  • Community first public safety plan
  • Modernizing City policies and procedures
  • Address income inequality
  • Encourage development in North and South City
  • Champion issues relating to children, youth, and families

Cara Spencercaraspencer4mayor.com

  • Violence reduction with a 10 step data driven plan
  • Strengthen St. Louis School system
  • Against Airport privatization
  • Center racial equity
  • Revitalize neighborhoods and reduce vacant property
  • Run City government efficiently and professionally
  • COVID-19 Recovery
  • Economic Development

Andrew Jonesandrewjones4mayor.com

  • Strengthen public safety by reducing violent crime and improving PR
  • Send more resources to schools
  • Economic Development by reducing violent crime and welcoming businesses
  • Infrastructure development
  • Thoughtful police reform

For information on how to vote in the Municipal Elections visit the St. Louis City Primary Muncipal Election webpage.

Consumer Directed Services Day of Action – February 3, 2021

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Your advocacy is needed this Wednesday, February 3rd!

The Missouri House Budget Committee is busy developing our state’s FY2022 budget and we must let them know how important the Consumer Directed Services (CDS) and other personal care programs are to Missourians with disabilities.

We are asking advocates across the state to reach out to House Budget Chair Smith and Vice-Chair Deaton to ask them to include additional funding for CDS providers so Missourians with disabilities and seniors can continue to receive quality personal care services in their own homes and their attendants can receive a living wage for the critical work they do.

Here is how you can reach the legislators making these important budget decisions:

Committee Member Name Twitter Phone Email
Rep. Cody Smith (R) – Chair @cody4mo
573-751-5458
Cody.Smith@house.mo.gov
Rep. Dirk Deaton (R) – Vice-Chair @dirkedeaton
573-751-9801
Dirk.Deaton@house.mo.gov

 

Here are some sample messages you can use:

Sample Tweet – Consumer:

I use CDS to live in my community. My attendant helps me _______, ___________, & _______. Without them I would not be able to live in my own home or work, and my attendant deserves a living wage. Please increase provider rates.

Sample Tweet – Attendant:

I am an attendant through CDS. I help the individual I work for ______, _______, & _________. I love my job, but I could make more money working less hours at target. Please increase provider rates so I can earn a living wage.

Sample Tweet – Loved One:

Someone I love uses CDS to live independently in their home. I worry about their health & safety if they do not have access to these services. I can not quit my job to help them; please increase the provider rates so they can live in their home.

Sample Email/Phone Script – Consumer:

Good afternoon, Representative:

My name is _____________ and I live in _______________. I am a person with _____disability and I use Consumer Directed Services to live in my home and participate in my community. Without CDS I would not be able to be independent, and I would have to live in a nursing home, which I do not want to do. Please increase the provider rate so that I can continue to live independently. As minimum wage continues to increase it makes it harder for me to keep attendants, as they can earn more money working at Target or Walmart. Please increase the provider rate so that I can continue to receive CDS, live in my home, and pay attendants a living wage.

Warmly,

________

Sample Email/Phone Script – Attendant

Good afternoon, Representative:

My name is _____________ and I live in _______________. I am a personal care attendant for a person with a significant disability. I assist them with activities of daily living such as using the restroom, bathing, getting dressed and eating meals, among other things. Without personal care attendant services the individual I assist would not be able to live in the community. It is crucial that the provider rate is increased so attendants can be paid a living wage.

Warmly,

___________

Sample Email/Phone Script – Loved One

Good afternoon, Representative:

My name is _______ and I live in ___________. My loved one has a significant disability uses Consumer Directed Services to live independently in the community. I can not afford to quit my job to help them if they do not have an attendant. Please increase the provider rate so that my loved one is able to pay a living wage and continue living in the community.

Warmly,

________

Missourians with disabilities want to remain independent in their own homes and our state lawmakers need to prioritize this funding.  Let them know how you feel!

If you need any additional information or have questions please contact Sarah Schwegel at Paraquad (314-289-4277 or sschwegel@paraquad.org).

Youth to Adult Medicaid Transition Summit

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On November 17th, Paraquad hosted a virtual summit to discuss the transition from youth to adult Medicaid services for people with disabilities.  This transition can be challenging and daunting for new college students or young adults entering the workforce. This event provided parents, educators, and students with the information and resources to navigate this change.

Hosts Briana Conley and Sarah Schwegel from Paraquad’s Public Policy and Advocacy department welcomed over 100 attendees and 14 speakers from across the St. Louis area, many of whom offered advice and shared their personal experiences with making the jump from youth to adult Medicaid services. The all-day event was open to the public and featured experts from Paraquad, the Special School District of St. Louis, St. Louis University, Metro Transit, and more. Attendees learned about the application process for adult Medicaid services, supplemental waivers available to people with disabilities, reasonable accommodations for college students with disabilities, transportation services for people with disabilities, and job placement services for recent high school or college graduates. Sarah Schwegel and Raven McFadden of Paraquad shared their experiences as college students transitioning to adult Medicaid services and living independently on campus.

Attendees received an informational packet with resources and additional information about Medicaid and the various services available to young adults with disabilities and their parents to ensure a smooth transition.

Voter Education

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Paraquad’s Public Policy & Advocacy Department has been busy spreading the word across the state about how and why to make sure everyone is able to vote and be heard this November.  If you haven’t had the chance to attend one of our trainings, no worries!  Public Policy & Advocacy Specialist Sarah Schwegel recorded a training to share with you.

Follow the link below to watch the video, and feel free to email sschwegel@paraquad.org with any questions!

Breaking Down Barriers: Ensuring People with Disabilities Can Exercise Their Right to VOTE

If you would like to attend a live presentation, check out our schedule, or contact us to schedule an event for your organization or group!

Federal Ask Regarding COVID-19 Relief

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At the federal level, Congress is continuing to work on the next COVID-19 relief package, and people with disabilities are at risk of being forgotten. Advocates must work together to ensure this doesn’t happen. You can find your legislators by using this tool.

To save you time, Paraquad has put together the following templates for you to use when reaching out to your legislators:

Twitter
Please include an increase in Medicaid funding in the next COVID-19 bill so that I can continue living safely in my community! (Tag your legislators)

Call
Hello, my name is ___(Your Name)___ I am a constituent, and my zip code is ___(Your Zip)___. I am a person with a disability, and I am extremely disappointed that HEALS does not include increased funding for Medicaid or protections for home and community-based services (HCBS). I rely on HCBS to live safely and independently in my home, not a nursing home. If HCBS is not funded, I could be forced to live in a nursing home, where the risk of COVID is much higher than in my community. I urge __(Your Elected Official)__to include increased Medicaid and HCBS funding in the final bill.
Thank you for your time!

Email/Letter
Dear Representative/Senator ____(Your Elected Official)_____,
I am a voter with a disability, who is an active member of your district. I am extremely disappointed that HEALS does not include increased funding for Medicaid or protections for home and community-based services (HCBS). I rely on HCBS to live safely and independently in my home, not a nursing home. [2-3 sentences about your attendants and how Medicaid helps you]. If HCBS is not funded I will be forced to live in a nursing home, where the risk of COVID is much higher than in my community. I do not want to live in a nursing home, I want to be an active member of my community! I urge you to advocate for increased Medicaid and HCBS funding in the final bill.
Thank you for your time.
Sincerely,
[Your Name & Contact Info]

If you would like assistance with crafting your message, please reach out to Sarah at sschwegel@paraquad.org or 314-289-4277.

MEDICAID IS ESSENTIAL

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Guest Blog by Gabriella Garbero

For more from Gabriella visit https://thegirlwhosits.com/ 

Having been a disabled Medicaid recipient for all of my adult life, I have seen firsthand how this program has allowed people with disabilities to live as independently as possible, in turn making society richer, more diverse, and an all-around better place to be. Medicaid has been critical in my life and the lives of people I care about because it has provided unparalleled coverage for many unique heath care needs, including home health services that allow us to live in the community, work, and go to school.

The effect that the Missouri Medicaid program has had on my life is truly immeasurable. I enrolled in Medicaid when I was eighteen and unsure how I would be able to live independently and go to college. I was immediately put on a waiver program that provided me with caregivers so I could live away from my parents and experience independent life for the first time. As I have gotten older, Medicaid has become even more valuable to my way of life. If I did not have it, I truly do not know where I would be, as being physically dependent on family members has become less possible over the years due to the ages of my parents and distance of my siblings. Medicaid has enabled and encouraged my independence in this way and so many others.

I began law school in the fall of 2018 and am pursuing a health law concentration. In my studies I have learned even more about Medicaid from different perspectives. Medicaid has widened the safety net for so many people who would otherwise be excluded from the health care market. In Missouri, a quarter of all people with disabilities and two-thirds of nursing home residents are covered by Medicaid. Now, with COVID-19 affecting virtually all of our lives, Medicaid has become an important protective tool for society because it covers the most vulnerable. Now, more than ever, we see that taking care of ourselves includes taking care of others who may not have the resources to do so themselves. Health care is and always has been a collective effort in which no one should be left out or overlooked, regardless of their level of need. Medicaid is an important entity for this purpose.

For those of us who are medically vulnerable, the stakes are always high, but are especially high right now due to the pandemic. Medicaid has always been a program that can bend and stretch in ways that allow for coverage of whoever is left out of the current health care market. That could be any of us at any point in life. If the pandemic has taught us anything, it should be that denying healthcare to individuals that need it can have catastrophic effects on us all. We need to support, strengthen, and increase access to Medicaid so that all Missourians have the quality, affordable healthcare that they and their families need to get and stay healthy.

Huge Turnout for Paraquad’s Virtual Medicaid Education Forum

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More than 80 disability activists, civic leaders, and community members attended our virtual forum exploring the importance of Medicaid to independent living for people with disabilities.

(Read full release on STLtoday)

Last week, we hosted community forum with disability activists Ellie Stitzer and Gabriella Garbero as part of our ongoing Community Voices for Medicaid initiative aimed at educating Missourians about the importance of Medicaid to the health and well-being of people with disabilities.

Public policy and advocacy specialist Sarah Schwegel moderated the event, which started with Ellie and Gabriella sharing a bit about growing up with a disability, their experiences in school, and their relationships with family, friends, and mentors.  From there, the conversation shifted into the Medicaid application and renewal process, and the program’s central role in keeping the panelists out of nursing homes.  The complications and frustrations people with disabilities often face as they navigate the system, including oppressive income and asset limits, system errors resulting in lost coverage, and low wages that make it hard to find and retain quality personal care attendants (PCAs), were also discussed.  Afterwards, State Representative Sarah Unsicker commented, “I’m glad I went because I learned more about the lives of people with spinal muscular atrophy and hearing personal stories is important to making good policy.”

If you missed this awesome educational opportunity, you can access the recorded webinar here.

In a continuation of our efforts, we’re partnering with Missouri Rural Crisis Center (MRCC) on July 9th to host a Facebook Live Ask Me Anything: Medicaid and Disability. Medicaid Ambassador Tyra Williams will tell her story and answer public questions about how the program makes it possible for her be an active member of her community.

If you would like more information about Paraquad’s Community Voices for Medicaid initiative, please call Sarah Schwegel at 314.289.4277, or email sschwegel@paraquad.org.

Meaningful Change – A Message from Aimee and Jerry

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Dear Paraquad Supporters,

In our mission to empower people with disabilities to live more independently, Paraquad works to address root causes of inequality. This year has presented unique challenges for our work, as COVID-19 has exacerbated inequalities in access to resources such as food, healthcare, and personal care.

Now, we are again reminded of another challenge that faces many of the people we serve. Racism is a disease that has plagued the United States since its inception. People with disabilities are diverse, coming from all races and backgrounds, and many face not only the barriers of an inaccessible society but also the injustice of racism.

From the early days of the disability rights movement, disability advocates have collaborated with and supported black civil rights activists. Brad Lomax, a black civil rights activist, was a leader in the disability rights movement and founder of one of the first Centers for Independent Living. He and other black advocates participated in the 504 sit-ins and helped pass landmark disability legislation. When Deaf students at Gallaudet University led the famous Deaf President Now movement, local black-owned businesses supported the movement by writing letters, donating money and services, and joining marches.

Today, we draw upon that long history of partnership to stand with the black community against racial hatred and violence. We are committed to working with our fellow advocates to dismantle structural racism at all levels. As an organization, we are committed to examine our own practices and continue to do better. We will keep advocating for policies that help those who do not have equal access to healthcare, employment, housing, and other basic needs.

Thank you for your belief in us and your dedication to making the world a better place. Paraquad will not stand silent while inequality and violence rages in our nation. Meaningful change will require all of us to work together. We accept that challenge and look forward to collaborating with you in the creation of a more equitable world.

In power,

Aimee Wehmeier and Jerry Ehrlich

Social Movements: An Introduction

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2020 has been a rough year. There is a global pandemic, communities are hurting, people are dying, and everything in the news is bleak. While what is happening today may seem hopeless, nationwide protests aren’t necessarily bad; they can invoke massive social change. During times of civil unrest, like we are experiencing now, we can look to other social movements, not only for comfort–to know what tactics have created change in the past but also for a framework for how to act and how to have cross-movement solidarity.

In this blog series, we will examine the intersectionality of four major movements: Civil Rights in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Second-Wave Feminism, LGBTQIA+ Pride, and Disability Rights. None of these movements would have been successful without the support of other movements and multiply marginalized (having more than one minority identity) people.

Before we can dive into the history of social movements to understand how cross-movement solidarity and being aware of intersectionality is crucial to any movement’s success, we need to understand what intersectionality is. As a concept, intersectionality is not new; in fact, Maria W. Stewart alluded to the idea of intersectionality in the 1830s. The term itself was coined by Kimberle Crenshaw in 1989. It is defined as “the interconnected nature of social categorizations such as race, class, and gender, as they apply to a given individual or group regarded as creating overlapping and interdependent systems of discrimination or disadvantage”. This definition is complicated and very academic. Another way to conceptualize intersectionality is to list out how you identify yourself and think about what identities might cause you to be discriminated against or oppressed. A white, middle-class, nondisabled man in his 40s is likely going to experience less discrimination than a 70-year-old Black woman who has a visible disability and is living in poverty. Folks who have intersecting identities are more likely to experience discrimination than those without. For example, a Black woman may experience discrimination in employment in companies where a Black man or a white woman world not.

Our identities make up how we interact with the world and how the world interacts with us. Massive social movements have been necessary to ensure equality for oppressed people for a long time (early settlers came to America to escape religious oppression). What our country is experiencing now is not new, and has a proven record of change, although slow and incremental. Take a moment to reflect on the Disability Rights Movement (which we will examine in a future post): the Rehabilitation Act was passed in 1973, section 504 was not enforced until 1977, and it took a 24-day sit-in to get that done; then ADA was not signed until 1990 after a number of other protests and a crawl up the capitol steps. Reform does not happen fast. Through examining past social movements, including our own, we can learn to be better allies and further rights of all people.